#8220;__ who?”

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Possible Answers: SEZ.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 2 Apr 19, Tuesday

Random information on the term “#8220;__ who?””:

The Siege of Aiguillon, an episode in the Hundred Years’ War, began on 1 April 1346 when a French army commanded by John, Duke of Normandy, laid siege to the Gascon town of Aiguillon. The town was defended by an Anglo-Gascon army under Ralph, Earl of Stafford.

In 1345 Henry, Earl of Lancaster, was sent to Gascony in south west France with 2,000 men and large financial resources. In 1346 the French focused their effort on the south west and, early in the campaigning season, an army of 15,000–20,000 men marched down the valley of the Garonne. Aiguillon commands both the Rivers Garonne and Lot, and it was not possible to sustain an offensive further into Gascony unless the town was taken. Duke John, the son and heir apparent of Philip VI, laid siege to the town. The garrison, some 900 men, sortied repeatedly to interrupt the French operations, while Lancaster concentrated the main Anglo-Gascon force at La Réole, some 30 miles (48 km) away, as a threat. Duke John was never able to fully blockade the town, and found that his own supply lines were seriously harassed. On one occasion Lancaster used his main force to escort a large supply train into the town.

#8220;__ who?” on Wikipedia


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Random information on the term “SEZ”:

A free-trade zone (FTZ) is a class of special economic zone. It is a geographic area where goods may be landed, stored, handled, manufactured or reconfigured and re-exported under specific customs regulation and generally not subject to customs duty. Free trade zones are generally organized around major seaports, international airports, and national frontiers—areas with many geographic advantages for trade.[1]

The World Bank defines free trade zones as “in, duty-free areas, offering warehousing, storage, and distribution facilities for trade, transshipment, and re-export operations.”[2] Free-trade zones can also be defined as labor-intensive manufacturing centers that involve the import of raw materials or components and the export of factory products, but this is a dated definition as more and more free zones focus on service industries such as software, back-office operations, research, and financial services.

Free-trade zones are referred to as “foreign-trade zones” in the United States (Foreign Trade Zones Act of 1934).[3] In the United States, FTZs provide Customs-related advantages as well as exemptions from state and local inventory taxes. In other countries, they have been called “duty free export processing zones,” “export free zones,” “export processing zones,” “free export zones,” “free zones,” “industrial free zones,” “investment promotion zones,” “maquiladoras,” and “special economic zones.”[3][4] Some were previously called “free ports”. Free zones range from specific-purpose manufacturing facilities to areas where legal systems and economic regulation vary from the normal provisions of the country concerned. Free zones may reduce taxes, customs duties, and regulatory requirements for registration of business. Zones around the world often provide special exemptions from normal immigration procedures and foreign investment restrictions as well as other features. Free zones are intended to foster economic activity and employment that could occur elsewhere.[5]

SEZ on Wikipedia