"— a deal!"

This crossword clue is for the definition: "— a deal!".
it’s A 19 letters crossword puzzle definition.
Next time, when searching for online help with your puzzle, try using the search term “"— a deal!" crossword” or “"— a deal!" crossword clue”. The possible answerss for "— a deal!" are listed below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!.

Possible Answers: ITS.

Last seen on: Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 24 2022

Random information on the term “"— a deal!"”:

E, or e, is the fifth letter and the second vowel letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is e (pronounced /ˈiː/); plural ees, Es or E’s. It is the most commonly used letter in many languages, including Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Latin, Latvian, Norwegian, Spanish, and Swedish.

hillul

The Latin letter ‘E’ differs little from its source, the Greek letter epsilon, ‘Ε’. This in turn comes from the Semitic letter hê, which has been suggested to have started as a praying or calling human figure (hillul ‘jubilation’), and was most likely based on a similar Egyptian hieroglyph that indicated a different pronunciation. In Semitic, the letter represented /h/ (and /e/ in foreign words); in Greek, hê became the letter epsilon, used to represent /e/. The various forms of the Old Italic script and the Latin alphabet followed this usage.

"— a deal!" on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ITS”:

English auxiliary verbs are a small set of English verbs, which include the English modal verbs and a few others. Although definitions vary, as generally conceived an auxiliary lacks inherent semantic meaning but instead modifies the meaning of another verb it accompanies. In English, verb forms are often classed as auxiliary on the basis of certain grammatical properties, particularly as regards their syntax. They also participate in subject–auxiliary inversion and negation by the simple addition of not after them.

In English, the adjective auxiliary was “formerly applied to any formative or subordinate elements of language, e.g. prefixes, prepositions.” As applied to verbs, its conception was originally rather vague and varied significantly.

The first English grammar, Pamphlet for Grammar by William Bullokar, published in 1586, does not use the term “auxiliary”, but says,

All other verbs are called verbs-neuters-un-perfect because they require the infinitive mood of another verb to express their signification of meaning perfectly: and be these, may, can, might or mought, could, would, should, must, ought, and sometimes, will, that being a mere sign of the future tense. (orthography has been modernized): 351 

ITS on Wikipedia