“Cancel that deletion”

This crossword clue is for the definition: “Cancel that deletion”.
it’s A 34 letters crossword puzzle definition.
Next time, when searching for online help with your puzzle, try using the search term ““Cancel that deletion” crossword” or ““Cancel that deletion” crossword clue”. The possible answerss for “Cancel that deletion” are listed below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!.

Possible Answers: STET.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 16 Apr 2018, Monday

Random information on the term ““Cancel that deletion””:

A diacritic – also diacritical mark, diacritical point, or diacritical sign – is a glyph added to a letter, or basic glyph. The term derives from the Ancient Greek διακριτικός (diakritikós, “distinguishing”), from διακρίνω (diakrī́nō, “to distinguish”). Diacritic is primarily an adjective, though sometimes used as a noun, whereas diacritical is only ever an adjective. Some diacritical marks, such as the acute ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ), are often called accents. Diacritical marks may appear above or below a letter, or in some other position such as within the letter or between two letters.

The main use of diacritical marks in the Latin script is to change the sound-values of the letters to which they are added. Examples are the diaereses in the borrowed French words naïve and Noël, which show that the vowel with the diaeresis mark is pronounced separately from the preceding vowel; the acute and grave accents, which can indicate that a final vowel is to be pronounced, as in saké and poetic breathèd; and the cedilla under the “c” in the borrowed French word façade, which shows it is pronounced /s/ rather than /k/. In other Latin-script alphabets, they may distinguish between homonyms, such as the French là (“there”) versus la (“the”) that are both pronounced /la/. In Gaelic type, a dot over a consonant indicates lenition of the consonant in question.


New Crossword clues and help App now available in the App Store and Google Play Store!
Crossword clues app Android Crossword clues app iphone iOs

“Cancel that deletion” on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “STET”:

The Latin adverb sic (“thus”, “just as”; in full: sic erat scriptum, “thus was it written”) inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous or archaic spelling, surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that might otherwise be taken as an error of transcription.

The usual usage is to inform the reader that any errors or apparent errors in quoted material do not arise from errors in the course of the transcription, but are intentionally reproduced, exactly as they appear in the source text. It is generally placed inside square brackets to indicate that it is not part of the quoted matter.

Sic may also be used derisively by the proofreader, to call attention to the original writer’s spelling mistakes or erroneous logic, or to show general disapproval or dislike of the material.

Though occasionally misidentified as an abbreviated word, sic is a Latin adverb used in English as an adverb, and, derivatively, as a noun and a verb.

STET on Wikipedia