Feudal estate

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Possible Answers: FIEF.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 18 Oct 18, Thursday

Random information on the term “Feudal estate”:

Lord is an appellation for a person or deity who has authority, control, or power over others acting like a master, a chief, or a ruler.[1][2] The appellation can also denote certain persons who hold a title of the peerage in the United Kingdom, or are entitled to courtesy titles. The collective “Lords” can refer to a group or body of peers.


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According to the Oxford Dictionary of English, the etymology of the word can be traced back to the Old English word hlāford which originated from hlāfweard meaning “loaf-ward” or “bread keeper”, reflecting the Germanic tribal custom of a chieftain providing food for his followers.[3] The appellation “lord” is primarily applied to men, while for women the appellation “lady” is used.[citation needed] However, this is no longer universal: the Lord of Mann, a title currently held by the Queen of the United Kingdom, and female Lord Mayors are examples of women who are styled Lord.[citation needed]

Under the feudal system, “lord” had a wide, loose and varied meaning. An overlord was a person from whom a landholding or a manor was held by a mesne lord or vassal under various forms of feudal land tenure. The modern term “landlord” is a vestigial survival of this function. A liege lord was a person to whom a vassal owed sworn allegiance. Neither of these terms were titular dignities, but rather factual appellations, which described the relationship between two or more persons within the highly stratified feudal social system. For example, a man might be Lord of the Manor to his own tenants but also a vassal of his own overlord, who in turn was a vassal of the King. Where a knight was a lord of the manor, he was referred to in contemporary documents as “John (Surname), knight, lord of (manor name)”. A feudal baron was a true titular dignity, with the right to attend Parliament, but a feudal baron, Lord of the Manor of many manors, was a vassal of the King.

Feudal estate on Wikipedia