“Kidnapped” monogram

This crossword clue is for the definition: “Kidnapped” monogram.
it’s A 32 letters crossword puzzle definition.
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Possible Answers: RLS.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 3 Jun 2018, Sunday

Random information on the term ““Kidnapped” monogram”:

A diacritic – also diacritical mark, diacritical point, or diacritical sign – is a glyph added to a letter, or basic glyph. The term derives from the Ancient Greek διακριτικός (diakritikós, “distinguishing”), from διακρίνω (diakrī́nō, “to distinguish”). Diacritic is primarily an adjective, though sometimes used as a noun, whereas diacritical is only ever an adjective. Some diacritical marks, such as the acute ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ), are often called accents. Diacritical marks may appear above or below a letter, or in some other position such as within the letter or between two letters.

The main use of diacritical marks in the Latin script is to change the sound-values of the letters to which they are added. Examples are the diaereses in the borrowed French words naïve and Noël, which show that the vowel with the diaeresis mark is pronounced separately from the preceding vowel; the acute and grave accents, which can indicate that a final vowel is to be pronounced, as in saké and poetic breathèd; and the cedilla under the “c” in the borrowed French word façade, which shows it is pronounced /s/ rather than /k/. In other Latin-script alphabets, they may distinguish between homonyms, such as the French là (“there”) versus la (“the”) that are both pronounced /la/. In Gaelic type, a dot over a consonant indicates lenition of the consonant in question.


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“Kidnapped” monogram on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “RLS”:

Royal Leamington Spa, commonly known as Leamington Spa or Leamington /ˈlɛmɪŋtən/ ( listen), is a spa town in Warwickshire, England. Originally a small village called Leamington Priors it grew into a spa town in the 18th century following the popularisation of its water which was reputed to have medicinal qualities, in the 19th century the town experienced one of the most rapid expansions in England. It is named after the River Leam, which flows through the town.

The town contains especially fine ensembles of Regency architecture, particularly in parts of the Parade, Clarendon Square and Lansdowne Circus.

In the 2011 census Leamington had a population of 55,733. Leamington is contiguous with the neighbouring towns of Warwick and Whitnash, which together form a continuous urban area, in 2011 the urban area had a population of 95,172.

Formerly known as Leamington Priors, Leamington began to develop as a town at the start of the 19th century. It was first mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Lamintone. For 400 years, the settlement was under the control of Kenilworth Priory, from which the older suffix derived. Its name came from Anglo-Saxon Leman-tūn or Lemen-tūn = “farm on the River Leam”. The spa waters had been known in Roman times, and the rediscovery in 1784 by William Abbotts and Benjamin Satchwell led to their commercialisation. Six of the seven wells were drilled for; only the original spring at the site of the Aylesford Well, adjacent to the Parish Church, occurred naturally.[not in citation given]

RLS on Wikipedia