“Little Red Book” author

This crossword clue is for the definition: “Little Red Book” author.
it’s A 36 letters crossword puzzle definition.
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Possible Answers: MAO.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 7 Nov 18, Wednesday

Random information on the term ““Little Red Book” author”:

E (named e /iː/, plural ees)[1] is the fifth letter and the second vowel in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. It is the most commonly used letter in many languages, including Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Latin, Latvian, Norwegian, Spanish, and Swedish.[2][3][4][5][6]

The Latin letter ‘E’ differs little from its source, the Greek letter epsilon, ‘Ε’. This in turn comes from the Semitic letter hê, which has been suggested to have started as a praying or calling human figure (hillul ‘jubilation’), and was probably based on a similar Egyptian hieroglyph that indicated a different pronunciation. In Semitic, the letter represented /h/ (and /e/ in foreign words); in Greek, hê became the letter epsilon, used to represent /e/. The various forms of the Old Italic script and the Latin alphabet followed this usage.

Although Middle English spelling used ⟨e⟩ to represent long and short /e/, the Great Vowel Shift changed long /eː/ (as in ‘me’ or ‘bee’) to /iː/ while short /ɛ/ (as in ‘met’ or ‘bed’) remained a mid vowel. In other cases, the letter is silent, generally at the end of words.


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“Little Red Book” author on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “MAO”:

Serotonin (/ˌsɛrəˈtoʊnɪn, ˌsɪərə-/[6][7][8]) or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that has a popular image as a contributor to feelings of well-being and happiness.[9] Biochemically, the indoleamine molecule derives from the amino acid tryptophan.[10] Serotonin is primarily found in the enteric nervous system located in the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). However, it is also produced in the central nervous system (CNS), specifically in the Raphe nuclei located in the brainstem. Additionally, serotonin is stored in blood platelets and is released during agitation and vasoconstriction, where it then acts as an agonist to other platelets.[11]

Approximately 90% of the human body’s total serotonin is located in the enterochromaffin cells in the GI tract, where it regulates intestinal movements.[12][13] The serotonin is secreted luminally and basolaterally, which leads to increased serotonin uptake by circulating platelets and activation after stimulation, which gives increased stimulation of myenteric neurons and gastrointestinal motility.[14] The remainder is synthesized in serotonergic neurons of the CNS, where it has various functions. These include the regulation of mood, appetite, and sleep. Serotonin also has some cognitive functions, including memory and learning. Modulation of serotonin at synapses is thought[by whom?] to be a major action of several classes of pharmacological antidepressants.

MAO on Wikipedia