Mac

This crossword clue is for the definition: Mac.
it’s A 3 letters crossword puzzle definition.
Next time, when searching for online help with your puzzle, try using the search term “Mac crossword” or “Mac crossword clue”. The possible answerss for Mac are listed below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!.

Possible Answers: FELLA.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 18 Jul 2018, Wednesday

Random information on the term “Mac”:

The Mackintosh or raincoat (abbreviated as mac or mack) is a form of waterproof raincoat, first sold in 1824, made out of rubberised fabric.[2]

The Mackintosh is named after its Scottish inventor Charles Macintosh, although many writers added a letter k. The variant spelling of “Mackintosh” is now standard.[3]

Although the Mackintosh coat style has become generic, a genuine Mackintosh coat is made from rubberised or rubber laminated material.


New Crossword clues and help App now available in the App Store and Google Play Store!
Crossword clues app Android Crossword clues app iphone iOs

It has been claimed that the material was invented by the surgeon James Syme, but then copied and patented by Charles Macintosh;[4] Syme’s method of creating the solvent from coal tar was published in Thomson’s Annals of Philosophy in 1818;[5] this paper also describes the dissolution of natural rubber in naphtha.

However, an exhaustive history of the invention of the Mackintosh was published by Schurer in 1952.[6] The essence of Macintosh’s process was the sandwiching of an impermeable layer of a solution of rubber in naphtha (derived from tar) between two layers of fabric. Syme did not propose the sandwich idea and his paper did not mention waterproofing. Waterproofing garments with rubber was an old idea, and was practised in pre-Columbian times by Aztecs, who impregnated fabric with latex. Later, French scientists made balloons gas-tight (and incidentally, impermeable) by impregnating fabric with rubber dissolved in turpentine, but this solvent was not satisfactory for making apparel.

Mac on Wikipedia