Moscow’s land: Abbr.

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Possible Answers: RUS.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 19 Nov 18, Monday

Random information on the term “RUS”:

Originally, the name Rus’ (Русь) referred to the people,[1] regions, and medieval states (9th to 12th centuries) of the Kievan Rus’. In Western culture, it was better known as Ruthenia from the 11th century onwards, [2] Its territories are today distributed among Belarus, Northern Ukraine, and the European section of Russia. The term Россия (Rossija), comes from the Byzantine Greek designation of the Rus’, Ρωσσία Rossía—spelled Ρωσία (Rosía pronounced [roˈsia]) in Modern Greek.


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One of the earliest written sources mentioning the people called Rus’ (as Rhos) dates to 839 in the Annales Bertiniani. This chronicle identifies them as a Germanic tribe called the Swedes. According to the Kievan Rus’ Primary Chronicle, compiled in about 1113, the Rus’ were a group of Varangians, Norsemen who had relocated somewhere from the Baltic region (literally “from beyond the sea”), first to Northeastern Europe, then to the south where they created the medieval Kievan state.[3]In the 11th century, the dominant term in the Latin tradition was Ruscia. It was used, among others, by Thietmar of Merseburg, Adam of Bremen, Cosmas of Prague and Pope Gregory VII in his letter to Izyaslav I. Rucia, Ruzzia, Ruzsia were alternative spellings.During the 12th century, Ruscia gradually made way for two other Latin terms, “Russia” and “Ruthenia”. “Russia” (also spelled Rossia and Russie) was the dominant Romance-language form, first used by Liutprand of Cremona in the 960s and then by Peter Damian in the 1030s. It became ubiquitous in English and French documents in the 12th century. Ruthenia, first documented in the early 12th century Augsburg annals, was a Latin form preferred by the Apostolic Chancery of the Latin Church.

RUS on Wikipedia