Mutual attraction in a relationship

This crossword clue is for the definition: Mutual attraction in a relationship.
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Possible Answers: CHEMISTRY.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 19 Jun 2018, Tuesday

Random information on the term “CHEMISTRY”:

J-pop (often stylized as J-POP; Japanese: ジェイポップ jeipoppu; an abbreviation for Japanese pop), natively also known simply as pops (ポップス, poppusu), is a musical genre that entered the musical mainstream of Japan in the 1990s. Modern J-pop has its roots in traditional Japanese music, but significantly in 1960s pop and rock music, such as The Beatles and The Beach Boys, which led to Japanese rock bands such as Happy End fusing rock with Japanese music in the early 1970s. J-pop was further defined by new wave groups in the late 1970s, particularly electronic synth-pop band Yellow Magic Orchestra and pop rock band Southern All Stars.


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Eventually, J-pop replaced kayōkyoku (“Lyric Singing Music”, a term for Japanese pop music from the 1920s to the 1980s) in the Japanese music scene. The term was coined by the Japanese media to distinguish Japanese music from foreign music, and now refers to most Japanese popular music.

The origin of modern J-pop is said to be Japanese-language rock music inspired by the likes of The Beatles. Unlike the Japanese music genre called kayōkyoku, J-pop uses a special kind of pronunciation, which is similar to that of English. One notable singer to do so is Keisuke Kuwata, who pronounced the Japanese word karada (“body”) as kyerada. Additionally, unlike Western music, the major second (sol and la) was usually not used in Japanese music, except art music, before rock music became popular in Japan. When the Group Sounds genre, which was inspired by Western rock, became popular, Japanese pop music adopted the major second, which was used in the final sounds of The Beatles’ song “I Want to Hold Your Hand” and The Rolling Stones’ song “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”. Although Japanese pop music changed from music based on Japanese pentatonic scale and distortional tetrachord to the more occidental music over time, music that drew from the traditional Japanese singing style remained popular (such as that of Ringo Shiina).

CHEMISTRY on Wikipedia