Off-color humor

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Possible Answers: DIRTY JOKE.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 10 Jul 2018, Tuesday

Random information on the term “Off-color humor”:

Sex comedy or more broadly sexual comedy is a genre in which comedy is motivated by sexual situations and love affairs. Although “sex comedy” is primarily a description of dramatic forms such as theatre and film, literary works such as those of Ovid[1] and Chaucer[2] may be considered sex comedies.


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Sex comedy was popular in 17th century English Restoration theatre. From 1953 to 1965, Hollywood released a number of “will she or won’t she?” sex comedies, starring Doris Day, Jack Lemmon and Marilyn Monroe. The United Kingdom released a spate of sex comedies in the 1970s notably the Carry On series. Hollywood released Animal House in 1978, which was followed by a long line of teen sex comedies in the early 1980s, e.g. Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Porky’s, Bachelor Party and Risky Business. Other countries with a significant sex comedy film production include Brazil (pornochanchada), Italy (commedia sexy all’italiana) and Mexico (sexicomedias).

Although the ancient Greek theatre genre of the satyr play contained farcical sex, perhaps the best-known ancient comedy motivated by sexual gamesmanship is Aristophanes’ Lysistrata (411 BC), in which the title character persuades the women of Greece to protest the Peloponnesian War by withholding sex.[3] The “boy-meets-girl” plot that is distinctive of Western sexual comedy can be traced to Menander (343–291 BC), who differs from Aristophanes in focusing on the courtship and marital dilemmas of the middle classes rather than social and political satire.[4]

Off-color humor on Wikipedia