Tandoori bread

This crossword clue is for the definition: Tandoori bread.
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Possible Answers: NAN.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 1 Apr 2018, Sunday

Random information on the term “Tandoori bread”:

Naan is a leavened, oven-baked flatbread found in the cuisines of the Middle East, Central Asia and South Asia.

The earliest appearance of “naan” in English is from 1810, in a travelogue of William Tooke. The Persian word nān ‘bread’ is attested in Middle Persian as n’n ‘bread, food’, which is of Iranian origin, and is a cognate with Parthian ngn, Balochi nagan, Sogdian nγn-, and Pashto nəγan ‘bread’.

The form naan has a widespread distribution, having been borrowed in a range of languages spoken in Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent, where it usually refers to a kind of flatbread. The spelling naan is first attested in 1979, and has since become the normal English spelling.

Naan as we know it today originates from Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent with influence from the Middle-East. The most familiar and readily available varieties of naan in Western countries are the varieties from the Indian subcontinent. In Iran, from which the word originated, nān (نان) does not carry any special significance, as it is merely the generic word for any kind of bread, as well as in other West Asian nations or ethnic groups in the region, such as amongst Kurds, Turks, Azerbaijanis (from both Azerbaijan and Iran), etc. Naan in parts of the Indian subcontinent usually refers to a specific kind of thick flatbread (another well-known kind of flatbread is chapati). Generally, it resembles pita and, like pita bread, is usually leavened with yeast or with bread starter (leavened naan dough left over from a previous batch); unleavened dough (similar to that used for roti) is also used. Naan is cooked in a tandoor, from which tandoori cooking takes its name. This distinguishes it from roti, which is usually cooked on a flat or slightly concave iron griddle called a tava. Modern recipes sometimes substitute baking powder for the yeast. Milk or yogurt may also be used to impart distinct tastes to the naan. Milk used instead of water will, as it does for ordinary bread, yield a softer dough. Also, when bread starter (which contains both yeast and lactobacilli) is used, the milk may undergo modest lactic fermentation.


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Tandoori bread on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “NAN”:

Joannie “Nan” Taylor (also Jackson) (Born 7 July 1933) is a fictional character in The Catherine Tate Show. She is one of the main characters of the show and is portrayed by Catherine Tate. She has since gone on to be the main character of a number of specials.

Joannie is most often referred to as “Nan”. She is an obnoxious cockney woman in her seventies who frequently swears at and criticises other people. She is often visited by her well-mannered grandson, Jamie (Mathew Horne) whom she refers to when visitors come “‘e ain’t got a job”, even though Jamie is in fact at university. His visits usually start off well enough, with Nan showing how grateful she is that he has come to see her. However, the situation usually takes a turn for the worst after she starts to make unfavourable comments about her neighbours, family, or home help visitors. Nan is mostly very pleasant to visitors, but after they leave, she criticises and rants about them. Sketches in series one show Jamie taking her to a pound shop, which ends with shambolic consequences. Joannie complains to her grandson about her home help visitor, whom she refers to as a “fucking Māori”. She also calls her new great-grandchild ugly. Her catchphrase, delivered at the crucial point of each sketch, is “What a fucking liberty!”

NAN on Wikipedia