Title like Bugs Bunny’s “Hare Trigger”

This crossword clue is for the definition: Title like Bugs Bunny’s “Hare Trigger”.
it’s A 56 letters crossword puzzle definition.
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Possible Answers: PUN.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 7 Oct 18, Sunday

Random information on the term “PUN”:

The pun, also called paronomasia, is a form of word play that exploits multiple meanings of a term, or of similar-sounding words, for an intended humorous or rhetorical effect. These ambiguities can arise from the intentional use of homophonic, homographic, metonymic, or figurative language. A pun differs from a malapropism in that a malapropism is an incorrect variation on a correct expression, while a pun involves expressions with multiple correct interpretations. Puns may be regarded as in-jokes or idiomatic constructions, as their usage and meaning are specific to a particular language and its culture.


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Puns have a long history in human writing. The Roman playwright Plautus was famous for his puns and word games, for example. [1][2]

Puns can be classified in various ways, including:

The homophonic pun, a common type, uses word pairs which sound alike (homophones) but are not synonymous.[3] Walter Redfern summarized this type with his statement, “To pun is to treat homonyms as synonyms.”[4] For example, in George Carlin’s phrase “atheism is a non-prophet institution”, the word prophet is put in place of its homophone profit, altering the common phrase “non-profit institution”. Similarly, the joke “Question: Why do we still have troops in Germany? Answer: To keep the Russians in Czech” relies on the aural ambiguity of the homophones check and Czech. Often, puns are not strictly homophonic, but play on words of similar, not identical, sound as in the example from the Pinky and the Brain cartoon film series: “I think so, Brain, but if we give peas a chance, won’t the lima beans feel left out?” which plays with the similar—but not identical—sound of peas and peace in the anti-war slogan “Give Peace a Chance”.[5]

PUN on Wikipedia