Tree house

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Possible Answers: NEST.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 13 Jan 19, Sunday

Random information on the term “Tree house”:

The ChĂȘne chapelle (lit. “chapel oak”) is an oak tree located in Allouville-Bellefosse in Seine-Maritime, France.

The oak tree is between 800[1] and 1,200[2] years old. It is 15 metres (49 ft) high and its base has a circumference of 16 metres (52 ft). Its hollow trunk hosts two chapels, which were built there in 1669 and are still used: Notre Dame de la Paix (“Our Lady of Peace”) and the Chambre de l’Ermite (“Hermit’s room”).[2] A spiral staircase around the trunk provides access to the chapels.[1]

When the tree was nearing 500 years of age, it was struck by lightning; the resulting fire burned slowly through the center and hollowed the tree out. The local Abbot Du Detroit and the village priest, Father Du Cerceau, claimed that the lighting striking and hollowing the tree was an event that had happened with holy purpose. So they built a place of pilgrimage devoted to the Virgin Mary in the hollow. In later years, the chapel above was added, as was the staircase.


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Tree house on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “NEST”:

Novell Embedded Systems Technology (NEST) was a series of APIs, data formats and network protocol stacks written in a highly portable fashion intended to be used in embedded systems. The idea was to allow various small devices to access Novell NetWare services, provide such services, or use NetWare’s IPX protocol as a communications system (and later also TCP/IP). Novell referred to this concept as “Extended Networks”,[1] and when the effort was launched they boasted that they wanted to see one billion devices connected to NetWare networks by year 2000.[2] NEST was launched in mid-1994 countering Microsoft’s similar Microsoft at Work efforts,[2] which had been launched in 1993.

Neither technology saw much third-party support, although some of NEST’s code was apparently re-used in Novell Distributed Print Services (NDPS), and thus iPrint.

NEST consisted primarily of a Novell protocol driver stack implemented in ANSI C.[3] The stack included drivers for then-popular networking hardware, including Ethernet, TokenRing, AppleTalk (actually referring to LocalTalk, a common confusion) and ISDN, as well as higher-level modules for protocols such as Novell’s own IPX, and AppleTalk, and later TCP/IP.[3]

NEST on Wikipedia