Well-behaved

This crossword clue is for the definition: Well-behaved.
it’s A 12 letters crossword puzzle definition.
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Possible Answers: GOOD.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 14 Jul 19, Sunday

Random information on the term “Well-behaved”:

In mathematics, an analytic function is a function that is locally given by a convergent power series. There exist both real analytic functions and complex analytic functions, categories that are similar in some ways, but different in others. Functions of each type are infinitely differentiable, but complex analytic functions exhibit properties that do not hold generally for real analytic functions. A function is analytic if and only if its Taylor series about x0 converges to the function in some neighborhood for every x0 in its domain.

Formally, a function f {\displaystyle f} is real analytic on an open set D {\displaystyle D} in the real line if for any x 0 ∈ D {\displaystyle x_{0}\in D} one can write

in which the coefficients a 0 , a 1 , … {\displaystyle a_{0},a_{1},\dots } are real numbers and the series is convergent to f ( x ) {\displaystyle f(x)} for x {\displaystyle x} in a neighborhood of x 0 {\displaystyle x_{0}} .


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Well-behaved on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GOOD”:

Natural law (Latin: ius naturale, lex naturalis) is a philosophy asserting that certain rights are inherent by virtue of human nature, endowed by nature—traditionally by God or a transcendent source—and that these can be understood universally through human reason. As determined by nature, the law of nature is implied to be objective and universal; it exists independently of human understanding, and of the positive law of a given state, political order, legislature or society at large.

Historically, natural law refers to the use of reason to analyze human nature to deduce binding rules of moral behavior from nature’s or God’s creation of reality and mankind. The concept of natural law was documented in ancient Greek philosophy, including Aristotle, and was referred to in Roman philosophy by Cicero. References to natural law are also found in the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, later expounded upon in the Middle Ages by Christian philosophers such as Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas. The School of Salamanca made notable contributions during the Renaissance. Modern natural law theories were greatly developed in the Age of Enlightenment, combining inspiration from Roman law with philosophies like social contract theory. Key proponents were Alberico Gentili, Francisco Suárez, Richard Hooker, Thomas Hobbes, Hugo Grotius, Samuel von Pufendorf, Matthew Hale, John Locke, Francis Hutcheson, Jean Jacques Burlamaqui, Emmerich de Vattel, Cesare Beccaria and Francesco Mario Pagano. It was used to challenge the divine right of kings, and became an alternative justification for the establishment of a social contract, positive law, and government—and thus legal rights—in the form of classical republicanism. Conversely, the concept of natural rights is used by others to challenge the legitimacy of all such establishments.

GOOD on Wikipedia